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The Beat

Robert Sund

Megan Sukys/Dave Beck
06/20/2005

Poems from Ish River Country collects the complete poems of poet, painter and calligrapher Robert Sund. Mr. Sund's few published volumes of poetry and frequent public readings established his reputation as one of the most distinctive poetic voices of the Pacific Northwest, where he enjoyed a tremendous popularity before his death in 2001. Also in this hour of The Beat, the 200 year anniversary of the birth of Hans Christian Andersen and our Monday book reviews by Nancy Pearl.



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At 2:05 pm - Hans Christian Andersen
2005 marks the 200 year anniversary of the birth of Hans Christian Andersen. From the exuberant early stories such as The Emperor’s New Clothes, though poignant masterpieces such as The Little Mermaid and The Ugly Duckling, to the darker, more subversive later tales written for adults, Andersen's stories are endlessly experimental, both humorous and irreverent, sorrowful and strange.. Tiina Nunnally’s recent translations capture the rawness and immediacy of Andersen’s style, for the first time enabling English readers to be as startled and amazed as his original readers were. Megan Sukys speaks with Tina Dunally about translating the Andersen tales.

Related Event:
To celebrate the 200th birthday of Hans Christian Andersen (1805 – 1875), Suzzallo Library is offering a special exhibition.

Related Links:

  • Hans Christian Andersen


  • At 2:33 pm - 'Poems from Ish River Country' byRobert Sund
    Poems from Ish River Country: the collected poems and translations of Robert Sund, read by Tim McNulty.
    Poems from Ish River Country collects the complete poems of poet, painter and calligrapher Robert Sund. Mr. Sund's few published volumes of poetry and frequent public readings established his reputation as one of the most distinctive poetic voices of the Pacific Northwest, where he enjoyed a tremendous popularity before his death in 2001. His short, imagistic poems, in the tradition of William Carlos Williams and Kenneth Rexroth, distill the essence of the Northwest landscape and in plain speech celebrate themes of family, friendship, work and quiet contemplation.
    Recorded live at Elliott Bay Book Company in December 2004.


    At 2:50 pm - Nancy Pearl
    Jeff MacGregor, a regular contributor to Sports Illustrated, and his wife, photographer Olya Evanitsky, spent the entire 2002 racing season following the NASCAR circuit – and Sunday Money: Speed! Lust! Madness! Death! A Hot Lap Around America with NASCAR (HarperCollins. 2005. 0-06-009471-0. $25.95) is the result. It’s filled with colorful characters and excitement enough to entertain even the greatest adrenaline junkie as MacGregor describes races run at death-cheating (and sometimes, sadly, deathly) speeds around an oval track, and an entrée into a world whose appeal some find utterly mystifying. (Me, I’m a convert to watching the sport on television as a result of MacGregor’s book.) MacGregor includes the history of the National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing, from the time it was just a gleam in the eye of its founder, Bill France, to its earliest years as solely the purview of gutsy speed nuts from below the Mason-Dixon line, up until today, with NASCAR’s broad appeal to Americans from all 50 states and all economic levels, and races from Daytona, Florida to Charlotte, North Carolina, to Indianapolis, Indiana, and beyond. He also acquaints readers with the big names in the sport, past and present, living and dead: Jeff Gordon, the Petty family dynasty, Dale Earnhardt, Tony Stewart, and more.

    Have you ever pondered over what would make you happy? Or what the nature of happiness really is? The heroine of Lisa Grunwald’s charming new novel, Whatever Makes You Happy (Random House, 2005) has taken on what she thinks will be the simple task of writing a book on the pursuit of happiness. What she finds is that even though she has everything she ever thought she wanted – a loving, faithful, gainfully employed husband, two bright and beautiful daughters, and a fairly high-powered career as a writer – she’s restless and dissatisfied. And it’s those feelings that lead her into a potentially disastrous affair with a well known painter. So does Sally Farber find happiness? And with whom? One of the best parts of this novel are the great quotations - from Aristotle to Flaubert – that open every chapter.


    04.24.18

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